Posts Tagged ‘space program’

Building 6

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Big building, where the shuttle was built

I could not have imagined a more ideal first job out of college for a young aerospace engineer. The Space Shuttle was still young, new and exciting. It had only launched three times when I had arrived for my first day of work in Building 6 of the Rockwell International plant in Downey, California. The front of the massive building was an impressive sight facing Lakewood Boulevard. Major sub-assemblies were being built in that factory – during my tour of the plant on that first day I was walking among the cockpit/crew station structure in their various states of emergence. The space program still captured attention – each mission was being followed closely.

It was odd that on my very first day I felt both young and old at the same time. Old in that, now well past high school age, I was now a college graduate starting a real career in the aerospace industry. Young on the other hand in that I was the most junior person in the First Stage Ascent, Guidance, Navigation and Control group. As we posed for our group picture, which was coincidentally being taken on my first day, I was surrounded by engineering veterans, most of whom had built their career during the Apollo era. I remember being stunned that some of there faces seemed familiar as fixtures in the behind-the-scenes footage shown in various Apollo era mission control room newsreel footage. White shirts, thin ties, pocket protectors abounded; not cliches, but real – this was the fashion of the day. I may have been the youngest new recruit, but that would change, and soon others would be added.

Space still mattered, and its workforce was growing, and it would continue to grow – at least for a time.

Rockwell International as a corporate entity is long since gone, having been bought by Boeing in the late 1990’s, but Building 6 still remains. Supporting just a fraction of the number of jobs, the site now hosts a film production company that you’ve never heard of before. Turns out buildings like this now retain value, not as monuments and museums to a once proud US space program, but as backdrop for Hollywood. Old plants such as this shuttle factory are ideal for filming when the director needs a dilapidated industrial setting.

So not surprisingly, in a region famous for film, Southern California once again has more of future in entertainment, than in space.